4 Blogger Lessons from Sochi Olympics

4 Blogger Lessons from Sochi Olympics

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We’ve all seen the pictures from the Sochi Olympics – unfinished hotels, rooms with toilets installed incorrectly, homeless doggies wandering around and many more abysmal failures. It is a sad reflection on them. But we as bloggers can learn things from their issues.

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Plan Accordingly
Had the Sochi people planned correctly, they would have had a timeline in place to get their rooms finished before people got there for the Olympics. Start using an editorial calendar so you don’t forget important holidays. Keep drafts of posts to jot down important ideas that you can come back and flesh out later.

Be Thorough in Your Work
In Sochi, a ton of money was spent to make the hotels beautiful. And they were…from the outside, but they got the smaller details wrong - ie putting toilets seats on wrong. Remember, that while a beautiful website or blog is important, if you have glaring grammatical errors or if you haven’t done your fact checking, people will grow impatient with your blog.

sochi toilets

photo credit: Twitter user Wylsacom

Budget Properly
Sochi spent about $50 billion, yes BILLION, on making their city Olympic ready, but all they will ever be remembered for is the pictures that people shared on social media of horrible hotel rooms and terrorist threats. When it comes to blogging, allocate your money and resources in a way that will benefit you the most, and that usually comes in the form of engaging content. Don’t spend a couple thousand on a fancy camera and be left eating ramen noodles for months with nothing to actually blog about.

Don’t be a Vladimir
While so many hotels remained largely unfinished, they all strangely enough were equipped with pictures of Vladimir Putin. While it is your blog, you can’t make everything about you. It is true, that you need to insert your personality into your blog writing, but don’t make every picture a selfie. People want to hear about your food experiences, so talk about chefs or family recipes and traditions. Sure, it is still about you, but not in a look-at-me-I’m-so-cool kind of way.

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